Search

Everybody needs an advocate.


In this Cura Cares Minute, Moises shares a story about how proactive advocacy averted disaster for a senior whose prescriptions were muddled.


This story reminds us that even though all our healthcare providers (hopefully) have our best interests in mind, an involved advocate can oversee to make sure all those involved are on the same page.


Advocacy for seniors means...


1. Be PROACTIVE when dealing with medical staff, whether in hospital or rehab.


2. CHECK whether prescriptions have been changed by someone other than the physician.


3. When returning home after a hospital or rehab stay, MAKE SURE prescriptions are correct.


If you'd like to share your story or learn more about how Cura for Care can help you or your family deal with aging at home or memory loss and live healthy, happy, and active at home, contact Moises at mpaz@pps-cura or 615-522-5265.


Don't forget to pass this on to your friends! It's a great way to share the care. Thanks for visiting!



DISCLAIMER: These stories and tips are aimed at enhancing the quality of life for families and individuals living with memory loss, dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, recovering from hospitalization or simply aging at home. Some information may not be advisable for your specific situation, so please consult with your doctor or care team professionals who know your situation best.

Updated: 21 hours ago

QUESTION: My 92-year-old grandfather lives alone. He’s always been healthy, but he got shingles last month and I’m beginning to see a decline. He’s always been adamant that he will never leave his home. What can I do to make his life happier if he truly never leaves home? Although one of us checks on him every day, I wonder if he’s lonely.


CURA ANSWER: Thanks for being such an advocate for your grandfather. It sounds like he’s been in good hands, and I’m not surprised he enjoys life at home.


Loneliness is very common for older adults at home. Your grandfather is having the same feeling a lot of older adults have. A great starting place to help with loneliness is by creating a schedule for some socialization/visits and exercise. Right now, it can be difficult to meet with people, but schedule a time each week to talk on the phone, over a video chat, or even in person if you feel safe doing that. Maybe you could arrange for him to video chat with distant friends or family.

Along with socialization, encourage exercise. Going for walks, taking care of plants, or exercise classes can show a great impact as well. If you combine those two, even better.

Since you are starting to see an overall decline, it would good to start looking at other areas he might be needing help. Be proactive and see if there are ways you can help with areas now, before it is an emergency. If his mobility is only slightly hindered, go ahead and think about how his home could be adapted and what is some therapy he could do to build strength. It's easier to address these areas earlier and plan ahead. If his hearing is limited, go ahead and think of ways he could be alerted to a visitor or schedule that doctor's appointment now.


Hope these ideas give you a glimpse into how being proactive can safe lots of grief down the road. Thanks for all you’re doing; caring families are heroes!






In this Cura Cares Minute, Moises tells how a friend shared the story of her mom with dementia, with a great takeaway for any of us who cope with the struggles of aging.


This story is a beautiful example of how the mother/daughter relationship can be reinforced even in the midst of trying circumstances with a little bit of patience and flexibility.


Person-centered care during quarantine means:

1. Take a minute to CONSIDER how it must feel to lose all control of your daily routine to someone younger than you.

2. Instead of creating a schedule and activities to take control, find a way to help EMPOWER your loved one.

3. Talk it over with your loved one to ASSESS if they feel satisfied or troubled over the amount of control they possess, and ADJUST your strategies accordingly.


If you'd like to share your story or learn more about how Cura for Care can help you or your family deal with aging at home or memory loss and live healthy, happy, and active at home, contact Moises at mpaz@pps-cura or 615-522-5265.


Don't forget to subscribe and pass this on to your friends! It's a great way to share the care.



Cura with label png white.png
PPS full white all.png
FCC with label png white.png

1900 Church St. Suite 300
Nashville, TN 37203

24 hrs/day, 7 days/week

© Copyright 2020CURAFORCARE   |   Graphics by Isaiah 53 Design